Continuity Camera on macOS is Magic

This is “it just works” territory stuff, in a way that hasn’t just worked in the past. Continuity Camera is a feature in macOS Whatevercodename2018 that lets you use your iPhone as a camera for your Mac. Preview uses this to let you quickly scan documents.

When you open Preview and choose the “Import from iPhone” option, your phone instantly opens up with a scanner that automatically recognizes documents:

The only tap I made on my phone was to hit the Save button at the end. After you hit Save on your phone, a PDF opens on your Mac with your scanned docs.

Screenshot of Preview with the scanned documents.

This works for pretty much anything I would want to digitize in a given month. I posted a shorter version to my coworking Slack and heard back

Whoa. That’s the first handoff-like feature that just worked, first time, without any trouble. Amazing.

I know you can scan documents with Notes and other apps, but this has so much less friction for me.

I’m convinced Apple is acutely aware that only nerds called Mac OS X “Mac OS Ten” and only nerds call the iPhone X “iPhone Ten.”

The fact that I didn’t have to write “iPhone Ex” and you knew what I meant proves my point.

I’m further convinced that they did the market research and found that the vast majority of consumers don’t care, but the nerds get a smug sense of superiority by calling it “Ten” and correcting people.

Giving them a pedantic toehold to correct people is win-win. Well, a win for Apple, a win for pedants, and a loss for anyone who ever hears the sentence “Actually it’s pronounced ‘ten.'”

Touch Disease

Today I learned I suffer from Touch Disease on my iPhone 6+. Symptoms include a touchscreen that doesn’t respond to your finger and a grey flickering bar at the top of the screen.

I thought my iPhone was just being weird but now I’m learning it’s an epidemic. The popular theory is that the chip responsible for dealing with multitouch is desoldering as the phone flexes.

In both the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, the Touch IC chips connect to the logic board via an array of itty-bitty solder balls—“like a plate resting on marbles,” Jessa explains. Over time, as the phone flexes or twists slightly during normal use, those solder balls crack and start to lose contact with the board.

At least one Apple Genius has their head in the sand:

I’ve talked to other geniuses, I’ve talked to engineers via escalations, I’ve talked with management in touch with their higher ups. This issue is caused by logic board damage. And if you haven’t opened your phone, exposed it to liquid, or bent the enclosure, you won’t experience this issue.

✅ Haven’t opened my iPhone
✅ Haven’t exposed to liquid
✅ Haven’t bent the enclosure
✅ Starting to experience the issue

Meanwhile Touch Disease is now accounting for about 11% of Apple Store’s daily iPhone repairs. I really hope Apple does something to address this. Especially now that more folks are on BOYD plans and are starting to keep their phones more than 2 years (something I was planning on with my 6+).

Now is also a good time to be reminded that companies cannot legally void your warranty in the US if you repair your devices, but good luck getting companies to recognize that without a lawyer.

Photo Credit: Omar Jordan Fawahl (CC BY-SA)