WALL·E on Typeset In The Future

We are a WALL·E house. For both my kids, it was the first movie that they loved. I think it’s because so much of the storytelling happens in the animation. Even if you can’t quite follow what everyone is saying, you can see the story happening. Plus, WALL·E is a bit of a charmer.

We have WALL·E merch. It can be hard to find stuff 10 years after a movie was made, but we still managed to wind up with a couple toys (one that makes lots of noise, yay I guess), plushes, at least 3 copies of the Little Golden Book (with gorgeous art, which is in the heading of this post), a twin bedset with matching curtain, and a few other things that I’m sure I’m forgetting.

Like I said, we are a WALL·E house.

When you have a movie more-or-less on repeat in your house, you notice a few things. WALL·E stands for “Waste Allocation Load Lifter: Earth-class.” You pick up some trivia, like the fact that the cockroach is named “Hal” after producer Hal Roach. But I have nothing on Typeset In The Future’s deep dive into WALL·E.

Ostensibly the post (and the book) is about the typography, and definitely covers that:

Before we get started, there is an important detail we must clear up. Our hero’s name is not, as you might think, WALL-E. Moreover, it definitely isn’t WALL•E. His name is WALL·E, and that dot is an interpunct, not a hyphen or a bullet.

and

WALL·E’s self-promotional poster is also a fine example of Handel Gothic, one of the movie’s supporting typefaces. Originally designed in 1965 by Donald J. Handel, the font has become a mainstay of design futurism. … My favorite use of the typeface in WALL·E occurs later in the movie, when we see the distinctly curved E of some Handel Gothic… on a handle. (I refuse to believe this is anything but a deliberate typographic joke.)


https://typesetinthefuture.files.wordpress.com/2018/08/walle_0_58_301.jpg?w=1100

But there is so much more interesting background information. The design of the ship The Axiom, the inspiration for the monorails, the class system aboard the Axiom, the economic inflation of BNL’s currency. If you have any love for Pixar’s (surprisingly large) yellow robot, please do yourself a favor and read WALL·E from Typeset In The Future.

Roundup, March 30

Newsletters

I'm seeing a few people are starting newsletter-format web things. Example a: Ed Vielmetti's Vacuum; example b: Chris Salzman's newsletter blog posts. The format is attractive as a writer because it's not daily and you don't have to write too much about a subject. Just add a heading and type a paragraph. I should try it.

Blogging

People are also blogging more. While I have a professional incentive to encourage blogging (did you know you can get a free blog at my employer, WordPress.com?), I also think there's value in re-distributing the web. You can read much deeper thoughts about that from Dan Cohen's Back to the Blog, (via Kottke, who shares his thoughts on 20 years of independent blogging)

Making the world worse

If you want to make people angry online, show people this tweet:

You can also download the blank bracket if you want to start a fight IRL (note the filename).

You can also make people angry by showing them Smelvetica, an annoyingly-kerned fork of Helvetica:

Movie Order Soundtracks

One thing I have discovered is that my kids prefer to listen to soundtracks in movie order. For example, compare the Frozen soundtrack album with the Frozen Soundtrack in Order playlist. The soundtrack front-loads all the hits, while the playlist mimics the movie. We've also been known to put the Moana – Movie Order playlist on repeat. I couldn't find a Coco playlist, so I created one (corrections welcome!):

We've also experimented with using Plex on a mobile device to stream just the audio of Coco to a Chromecast Audio at bedtime, but that was a little too engaging and didn't actually put the kiddo to sleep.

Checkins

  • Blackrocks' Murray Project – I appreciate an Imperial IPA under 9%. Very good if you can find it, better balanced than a lot of IIPAs.
  • Bell's Oberon – It's nice to have one on release day. Post-over-hype, it's still a good American Wheat. If you want to know what Saaz hops taste like, it's this.
  • Uinta Rise & Pine – Black IPAs where everywhere 5 years ago, now they're almost impossible to find. The Juniper is interesting, but I think I'd like it more with a hop. I love Uinta's Hop Nosh from when I worked remotely for an office in Utah, and am glad to see them distributing in Michigan.
  • El Barzon – very nice Mexican food and very nice Italian food in Detroit. Not fusion. We had the kids with us but it'd be better for a date night. I wonder if this side of Corktown will go nuts if Ford buys the train station.
  • Sidetrack – I guess it's been a while, since they seem to still be expanding. Better service, same great menu.
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